Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Foundation Grants from the Lumina Foundation for Education- Giving on a national basis. The foundation’s primary goal is to raise the proportion of the U.S. adult population who earn college degrees to 60 percent by 2025. The foundation is dedicated to expanding access and success in education beyond high school. While their mission focuses on both student access and success in higher education, the foundation’s emphasis is on attainment, defined as completing post-secondary certificates, associate and baccalaureate degrees and credentials.

States: All States

Average Amount: $1,000.00 – $500,000.00

Total Amount: $30,000,000.00 – $60,000,000.00

Address: PO Box 1806, Indianapolis, IN 46206-1806

Telephone: 317-951-5300


Website: The Lumina Foundation

Eligibility: Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Adult Literacy, Arts, Early Childhood, General Education, Health/PE, Library, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Vocational

Deadline: Ongoing


 Educational Grants from the Mockingbird Foundation- Grants given to support K-12 music education on a national basis. Education may include the provision of instruments, texts, and office materials, and the support of learning space, practice space, performance space, and instructors/instruction. Mockingbird is particularly interested in projects that foster self-esteem and free expression. The Foundation is interested in targeting children 18 years or younger, but will consider projects which benefit college students, teachers, instructors, or adult students.

States: All States

Average Amount: $100.00 – $5,000.00


Website: The Mockingbird Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Other

Program Areas: Arts, At-Risk/Character

Deadline: 8/1/2014

The Dark Side of Grant Writing

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS


Happy New Year, gentle reader! My resolution for this blog is to keep it fresh and very useful for fledgling grant writers in schools everywhere.

This article is part of a series of articles about grant writing for teachers and school personnel. I’ve been outlining steps to take in the process, and have provided you with some templates for your narratives, and a budget planning Excel document that will help you make sure you cover all the financial bases. This blog is part of a super Grants Database you can search for appropriate resources.

You’ve decided that grant writing is for you, the discipline required to meet deadlines is in your genetic code, you love the social nature of making relationships with the power brokers in your community, and you love the adulation you receive from the other teachers in your community. This is the pretty picture; most of you who have done this for a while know that there is a dark side to the grants world. We’ll talk a little bit about that today.

We’ll say you now have a couple of successful grant applications under your belt, you’ve made inroads in your community for developing a steady stream of funding from several sources, things are really going well. You were not, however, prepared for the enormous amount of time all of these activities have taken from your schedule. Your husband/wife is now permanently angry with you all the time for missing all those soccer matches that little Poindexter has played. The bags under your eyes are deeper than the Grand Canyon, and the laundry is about a week overdue.

Don’t despair, you will find ways to manage your time so that all can be accomplished, and you will even be graceful doing it. One of the keys is to delegate. Some sections of a grant narrative can be done by people who are eager to help. In an earlier blog I cautioned against writing grants in committee, it rarely produces a coherent application. However, to delegate some of the demographics paragraphs and maybe budget research is acceptable. You’ve made a list of the costs you will incur in your project, but someone else can help you get the three bids you’re going to need to find the lowest costs. This one is sort of fun, you get to work with vendors and learn to sweet talk them to a fair price. Don’t kid yourself, it is always negotiable. Someone accused me of being unfair to corporate America for doing this, come on now folks, think about that for a minute.

Another cast member in the dark side of the grant writing drama is the whiner. There’s a teacher in your building who snipes at you behind your back, suggesting that you don’t know what you are doing, and that your motives are impure. This person is making a career of trashing your work, and it isn’t fun. My solution to this one is to sit down with the whiner to try to find out what the real issues are. Chances are its jealousy; they want some of this limelight you are now basking in. A good solution to this is to find something for the whiner to do. Bring him into the fold, and then be sure to give him lots of credit for being helpful along the way. Amazing how fast the whining will stop.

There are other parts to the dark side, the fact that now that you’ve been successful, people expect this level of success on a regular basis. I can tell you from experience, there will be dry spells along the way, you will develop writer’s block on occasion, and life will intervene to take you away from the tasks of putting together an application. You are not a superhero, you do what you can, and it’s all you can do anyway.

So, grant writer that you are, suck up to the dark side, learn to embrace it, and continue on your path to glory.

It’s all for the kids anyway, right?

Please comment on this post, let me know if there are topics you’d like me to cover. I have a million stories to tell, seven years as a grants manager has taught me a few things and I’d love to share it all with you.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Foundation Grants from the Easton Sports Development Foundation II- the goal of The Easton Sports Development Foundation is to promote the sport of archery and/or bow hunting and continue these efforts through college and university programs. We want to be a catalyst in the development of archery as a mainstream sport and help it to grow at the state, regional, and national level. Requests for less than $25,000.00 can be submitted at any time.

States: All States

Average Amount: $1,000.00 – $50,000.00

Total Amount: $1,000,000.00 – 5,000,000.00

Address: 7855 Haskell Avenue, Suite 360, Van Nuys, CA 91406

Telephone: 818-909-2207 Ext. 306


Website: Easton Sports Development Foundation II

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Health/PE

Deadline: 3/1/2014


Computing Education for the 21st Century from the National Science Foundation- the Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) program aims to build a robust computing research community, a computationally competent 21st century workforce, and a computationally empowered citizenry. In this undertaking, there are three interrelated challenges: the significant underproduction of degrees needed for the computing and computing-related workforce, the longstanding underrepresentation of many segments of our population, and the lack of a presence of computing in K-12. CE21 thus supports efforts in three tracks: Computing Education Research, CS 10K, and Broadening Participation.

States: All States

Average Amount: $600,000.00 – $1,000,000.00

Total Amount: $15,000,000.00

Address: 4201 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA 22230

Telephone: 703-292-8900


Website: National Science Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: General Education, Technology

Deadline: 3/12/2014

Training for Grant Writers

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS

steno and pen

This article is part of a series of articles about grant writing for teachers and school personnel. I’ve been outlining steps to take in the process, and provided you with some templates for your narratives, and a budget planning Excel document that will help you make sure you cover all the financial bases. This blog is part of a super Grants Database, you can search for appropriate resources.

If you have been selected to be “the school grant writer”, it’s probably because you raised your hand in a faculty meeting when the subject of fund raising came up. You have a reputation for being organized, detail oriented, and timeline friendly. These are all great traits, but the process of getting a grant can sometimes be a “be careful what you wish for” situation. Working through the writing process will take weeks, perhaps months if you are doing it right.

Sounds daunting, but once you have a few grant applications (successful ones) under your belt, subsequent applications will become easier. You have an opportunity to become a hero in your school, and if you are really good at it, develop a career in grantsmanship.

Assuming you are in this now for the long haul, it may have occurred to you that there might be some formal training available that can help you become an effective grant writer. I’ve outlined a few of the possibilities (free and not so free) for formal training in this blog.

  • Full-fledged master’s degree program in grants management:

Concordia – online and distance education solution.

  • Grant Writing USA, organized workshops throughout the country, a formulaic approach to learning how to write and manage grants (not for everyone, but useful nonetheless.)
  • Foundation Center – one of the oldest and most established organizations for grant writing professionals – worth a look-see. If nothing else, network with other professionals.
  • YouTube presentation – are you visual? YouTube has many videos on the process of writing a grant. We link to one here (disclosure – this video was selected randomly with no allegiance to any commercial products it may highlight.)
  • A librarian’s approach, always a good place to start.
  • Slideshare presentation – if you aren’t familiar with Slideshare, take a look at the resources available on this site.
  • LinkedIn – Grant professional’s corner – meet and network with fellow grant writers, they are always available to help you through sticky parts of the process.

So many resources and great training opportunities, so little time. All you have to do is Google (or Bing, or Yahoo) “grant writing training”. You will be astonished at what pops up.

Let me know what you think about formal training! Maybe you are more organic and learn best by doing – let me know your training selections.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Ford Foundation Educational Grants from The Ford Foundation- The foundations grant making focuses on reducing poverty and injustice; promoting democratic values; and advancing human knowledge, creativity and achievement. Types of grants the foundation makes: General/core support, Project, Planning, Competition, Matching, Recoverable, Individual, Endowment, Foundation-administered project, and Program-related investment.

States: All States

Total Amount: $450,000,000.00 – $480,000,000.00

Average Amount: $100,000.00 – $500,000.00

Address: 320 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017-4801

Telephone: 212-573-5000


Website: The Ford Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: After-School, Arts, At-Risk/Character, Community Involvement/Volunteerism, Early Childhood, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Technology

Deadline: Ongoing


EngineerGirl Essay Contest from Lockheed Martin- In honor of the NAE’s 50th anniversary, we invite you to imagine how engineering might change our lives over the next 50 years, in one of the following areas: Nutrition, Health, Communication, Education, or Transportation. Guidelines for length are: Grades 3–5: about 400 to 500 words; Grades 6–8: about 600 to 800 words; and Grades 9–12: about 1100 to 1500 words.

States: All States

Average Amount: $100.00 – $500.00

Address: National Academy of Engineering 500 Fifth St. NW Rm. 1047 Washington, DC 20001


Website: Engineer Girl

Eligibility: Public School, Private School

Program Areas: General Education, Science/Environmental, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)

Deadline: 3/1/2014

Grant Writing – Your New Career?

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS

pen writing

You are well on your way to finishing your narrative for your grant application to XYZ Foundation. I’ve been concentrating on the technical aspects of grant writing so you’ll have a template, outline and budget planner to use for any grant application process. Just in time for the holidays, let’s step back and scratch the itch I know you’ve been developing. What’s is like to write grants for a living?

First, I need to help you distinguish between grant writing and grants management. If you’re getting really good at this, and enjoy the process (deadlines and stress included), you may want to explore the wonderful world of a career in grantsmanship. If you are the go-to grants person in your school, you are a grant writer. Your school district most likely has a business manager (many are deputy superintendents) who takes the proceeds of successful grant applications and manages the cash flow and expenditure of those funds. If you haven’t done this yet, make an appointment to sit down with the district business manager to explain your progress and interest in working with him/her to make this process smooth and professional.

If this relationship is already perking along, and you are comfortable with your role and the lines around which you actually experience the money, you’ll also want to make sure your principal is aware of your desires and professional management skills. Your district superintendent will want to be in on these discussions, leaving any one of those people out of your conversation is very bad practice, and your new career will end quickly.

I began my career as a teacher and library media specialist who wanted to bring in some funds to improve my school/s. Sound familiar? Believe me, it is intoxicating when the approval letters start to arrive, and checks are cut. Be sure your foundation managers know to whom they will be sending the funds, and how the checks should be endorsed and deposited. Most likely, you will never see the check, unless it’s a small local grant from a merchant in town who has heard of your project. It is critical that these checks are handled correctly and handed over promptly to the appropriate parties. Make copies of everything, put your paperwork in a binder, and keep it secure. Create a duplicate binder for your business manager and update it for her frequently. Hand deliver checks or send via certified mail.

Pretty soon in my grant writing career, I knew I wanted to do this again, and again, and ….. I had no idea where to take this new found ambition. You have now entered the spooky world of school district politics. The way you approach this, and the manner in which you communicate your intentions is very important. Transparency rocks!

I knew I wanted to broaden my education, so I went back to school to finish a master’s degree in educational administration. Good education junkie that I am, this degree program was heady and full of promise, and I happily completed it for many reasons having nothing to do with grants. The possibilities are endless for advancement in public (or private) education. School districts need great leaders. Keep in mind your school year will lengthen, summer vacations will vanish, and your colleagues will look at you in a whole new light. Don’t get bogged down by faculty room nattering about “those idiots downtown” even if you’ve jumped right in to those conversations in the past. If your plans pan out, you’re about to become an idiot.

My first administrative job in a large urban district was in the curriculum office. This was ideal for me, coming from special education and library media, I could now broaden my outlook to curriculum k-12, a great vantage from which to view the needs of your learning community. If you remember you are creating with standards as your guide (Common Core State Standards), and all subjects as your palette, you can start painting pictures that illustrate the road to the improvement of academic achievement for your students. Remember, it’s not about the money; it’s really about children and their path to learning. You can become well rounded in the curriculum office, or as a principal.

Then as time went by and a position opened up in the grants office, I saw the opportunity and went to work. My responsibilities were for acquiring and managing state, federal, private and corporate grant resources for schools. There were times when I felt I was ill-suited for the job, bean counting and attention to meticulous detail were really not my forte, but I had a great staff of accounting clerks to help me keep it all straight.

I had big wipe off calendars on the wall to keep me on track, and with help from some professionals in the field, it has become a great career. I have now moved on to consulting, blogging and grant making, another avenue with promising career possibilities. For your perusal, I present you with some organizations that may help you decide if this is for you, and help you scratch your itch:

Networking: LinkedIn, Grant Manager Profiles

Education and Training: Lists of degree programs. Professional OrganizationsHow-to sites. and Blogs.

You’ll work long hours, have stressful days, and think you’ve lost your mind on several occasions, but you will join a group of professionals who are in it for the kids in a very big way. If it’s not about the kids, you’re in it for the wrong reason.

Let me know what you think!